Publications

Girlhoods:

  • Shakespeare and the Performance of Girlhood. Palgrave Shakespeare Studies. Palgrave, 2014. Available from Palgrave Macmillan and Amazon.ca.
  • "Girls and Girlhood in Adaptations of Shakespeare." Special Issue for Borrowers and Lenders: the Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation vol. 9 no. 1 (2014). http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/1366/show
  • "Prospero's Girls." Borrowers and Lenders: the Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation vol. 9 no. 1 (2014). http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/1382/show
  • "Enter Ofelia Playing on a Lute." The Afterlife of Ophelia. ed. Kaara L. Peterson and Deanne Williams. Palgrave, 2012: 119-137.
  • "Isabelle de France: Child Bride." The Perilous Narrow Ocean: French Connections in the Renaissance ed. Hassan Melehy and Catherine Gimelli Martin. (Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013): 27-50.
  • "No Man's Elizabeth: Frances Yates and the History of History." The Impact of Feminism on Renaissance Scholarship ed. Dympna Callaghan. Palgrave, 2007: 238-58. (Download PDF)
  • "Hope Emily Allen Speaks with the Dead." Leeds Studies in English 35 (2004): 137-160. (Download PDF)
  • "Mary Tudor's French Tutors: Renaissance Dictionaries and the Language of Love." Dictionaries vol. 21 (2000): 37-51. (Download PDF)

French Connections:

  • The French Fetish from Chaucer to Shakespeare. Cambridge University Press, 2004. Paperback, 2006.
  • "Isabelle de France: Child Bride." The Perilous Narrow Ocean: French Connections in the Renaissance ed. Hassan Melehy and Catherine Gimelli Martin. (Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013): 27-50.
  • “Roussillon and Retrospection in All’s Well That Ends Well.” Representing France in the English Renaissance ed. Jean-Christophe Meyer. University of Delaware Press, 2008: 171-192. (Download PDF)
  • “Mary Tudor’s French Tutors: Renaissance Dictionaries and the Language of Love.” Dictionaries vol. 21 (2000): 37-51. (Download PDF)
  • “‘Will you go, Anheers?’ The Merry Wives of Windsor, II. i. 209.” Notes and Queries vol. 46 no. 2 (Spring, 1999): 233-234. (Download PDF)
  • The Merry Wives of Windsor and the French-English Dictionary.” Le Shakespeare français: sa langue/ The French Shakespeare: His Language. ALFA: Actes de langue française et de linguistique vol. 10. (1998): 233-243. (Download PDF)

Medievalisms:

  • "Shakespearean Medievalism and the Limits of Periodization in Cymbeline." Literature Compass 8/6 (2011): 390–403 (Download PDF)
  • "What Shakespeare Did to Chaucer: Books and Bodkins in Hamlet and The Tempest." co-authored with Seth Lerer. Shakespeare. Journal of the British Shakespeare Association 8 (2012): 1-13. (Download PDF)
  • Deanne Williams, “Shakespearean Medievalism and the Limits of Periodization in Cymbeline.” Literature Compass 8/6 (2011): 390–403 (External link)
  • Postcolonial Approaches to the European Middle Ages: Translating Cultures. Co-editor, with Ananya Jahanara Kabir. Cambridge University Press, 2005. Paperback, 2010.
  • “Medievalism in English Renaissance Literature.” A Companion to Tudor Literature, ed. Kent Cartwright. Blackwell, 2010: 213-227. (Download PDF)
  • “Rudyard Kipling and the Norman Conquest.” Ariel 39.3 (2008): 107-123. (Download PDF)
  • “Roussillon and Retrospection in All’s Well That Ends Well.” Representing France in the English Renaissance ed. Jean-Christophe Meyer. University of Delaware Press, 2008: 171-192. (Download PDF)
  • “Boethius Our Contemporary: The Consolatio in Medieval and Early Modern England.” The Erotics of Consolation ed. Catherine Léglu and Steve Milner. Palgrave, 2008: 205-226. (Download PDF)
  • Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay and the Rhetoric of Temporality.” Reading the Medieval in Early Modern England ed. David Matthews and Gordon McMullan. Cambridge University Press, 2007: 31-50.
    (Download PDF)
  • “Isabelle de France: Child Bride.” The Perilous Narrow Ocean: French Connections in the Renaissance eds. Hassan Melehy and Catherine Gimelli Martin. Forthcoming.
  • All’s Well That Ends Well and the Art of Retrograde Motion.” All’s Well That Ends Well: New Critical Essays ed. Gary Waller. Routledge, 2006: 152-170. (Download PDF)
  • “Dido Queen of England.” ELH 71 (Spring, 2006): 31-59. (Download PDF)
  • “Papa Don’t Preach: The Power of Prolixity in Pericles.” University of Toronto Quarterly, vol. 71 no. 2 (Spring, 2002): 595-622. (Download PDF)
  • “Herod’s Cities: Cesaria and Sebaste in Twelfth Night.” Notes and Queries vol. 48 no. 3 (Fall, 2001): 276-8. (Download PDF)

Medieval English Literature:

  • “The Dream Visions.” Yale Companion to Chaucer ed. Seth Lerer. Yale University Press, 2005: 147-78. (Download PDF)
  • “Gower’s Monster.” Postcolonial Approaches to the European Middle Ages: Translating Cultures: 127-50. (Download PDF)
  • “Introduction: A Return to Wonder” co-authored with Ananya Kabir. Postcolonial Approaches to the European Middle Ages: Translating Cultures: 1-24.

Pioneering Women Scholars:

  • “No Man’s Elizabeth: Frances Yates and the History of History.” The Impact of Feminism on Renaissance Scholarship ed. Dympna Callaghan. Palgrave, 2007: 238-58. (Download PDF)
  • “Hope Emily Allen Speaks with the Dead.” Leeds Studies in English 35 (2004): 137-160. (Download PDF)

Queen Elizabeth I:

  • “Elizabeth I: Size Matters.” Goddesses and Queens: The Iconography of Elizabeth I ed. Lisa Hopkins and Annaliese Connolly. Manchester University Press, 2007: 69-80. (Download PDF)
  • “No Man’s Elizabeth: Frances Yates and the History of History.” The Impact of Feminism on Renaissance Scholarship ed. Dympna Callaghan. Palgrave, 2007: 238-58. (Download PDF)
  • “Dido Queen of England.” ELH 71 (Spring, 2006): 31-59. (Download PDF)

Shakespeare Adaptations:

  • “Rohinton Mistry’s Family Shakespeare.” Borrowers and Lenders, the Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation 2 vol. 2 (Fall/Winter 2007). (Download PDF) (External link)
  • “Mick Jagger Macbeth.” Shakespeare Survey 57 (2004): 145-68. (Download PDF)